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Let’s disrupt generational poverty

Everyone has been preaching for years that people need to focus on creating generational wealth for their families. During my time as a financial services practitioner, I’ve read hundreds of articles, research papers, and studies, all of which shed light on the fact that the wealth disparities in the United States continue to widen. So, are people focused on creating wealth or just earning enough to get by? The wealth data I continue to review year after year seriously disappoints me, which prompted me to start The #BuildWealth Movement™

I can see the problem, clear as day. Our society speaks about how this is the land of opportunity, how you can create generational wealth, how you can “live the American dream.” Well, that dream isn’t a reality for millions of people, and it looks more like a nightmare. So, how about this? Let’s focus our attention on how we can disrupt generational poverty™.

Disrupting generational poverty isn’t something that my Movement can do alone. I’m just one person who is working to change the way people THINK and FEEL about money. During any interactions with individuals or groups, I feel that I’m doing my part to help disrupt generational poverty simply because I’m an expert. I’m giving really good advice. What people decide to do with that advice is up to them.

The way people THINK and FEEL about money causes you to do one of two things, make a decision or not make a decision. Notice that I didn’t say good decision or bad decision. Every decision you make has consequences one way or another. But, the thoughts and emotions around money play out in our everyday lives, sometimes to the detriment of future generations. Let me give you a few examples to drive home this point. I’ve had someone (actually, multiple people) say the following to me:

“My parents didn’t leave me anything, and I don’t plan on doing that for my kids. They’ll figure it out.”

“I had to work two jobs and I took out loans for college. I want my kids to learn the value of hard work.”

“I make good money, but I still feel like I’m living check to check.”

“Growing up, talking about money was always considered “grown folks” business.”

“My bank isn’t paying me much in interest, but if I put my money in the stock market, I could lose it all tomorrow.”

Now, how do you think hearing things like this makes me feel? In my earlier years as a financial planner, I used to get upset. Over time, I used such remarks as fuel to my fire, continued to work my plan, and ensured that people never EVER say such a thing like that again. 

I also realized that many people don’t have examples within their families or community of what wealth looks like. It just doesn’t seem to be obtainable. Think about the kids who grow up in the hood. They idolize drug dealers, gang-bangers, professional athletes, or entertainers. Why? Because that’s all they see or hear the people talking about in their hood. If that kid is lucky enough to get some exposure to the outside world, they’ll most certainly aspire to do something different.

The same thing happens to adults. Many of us have been deemed successful by our peers or family because we have a fancy job title, nice car, and a house. You “appear” to be successful, but when you begin to delve into your financial situation, you realize the ugly truth. The job stresses you out, and you always fantasize about your dream job, but you’ve got bills, so those dreams get put on the back burner. You have a massive student loan balance, and you feel like it’s going to take decades to pay it off, if ever. The car is nice, but you have a huge car payment each month, and the car’s maintenance is a cash drain. The house, maybe it’s a decent spot, but you’ve got that mortgage and other expenditures coming out of your bank accounts just to maintain the place. Now, you’re left trying to figure out how to invest for retirement, paying for more life insurance, or saving money for a child or your children’s college education. Then you might be considering making an investment into more real estate, building an emergency fund, making sure your credit stays above a 720, meeting with an attorney to get your wills and trusts done, or maybe even starting a business. 

Whew!! That’s a lot huh?

No wonder people can’t disrupt generational poverty. There just isn’t enough time in the day (so “they” say) or enough money coming into our bank accounts to handle all of this stuff. If you don’t personally know someone taking care of business, you don’t believe it’s possible. And, if nobody in your family or community is living the life you dream about, then YOU MUST BE THE FIRST! 

Here’s my strategy on how we can all disrupt generational poverty. I am going to keep it as simple as possible. Experience has taught me that more people can adopt simple, as opposed to complicated. So, here it goes!

  1. Write down the financial goals you want to accomplish. Be sure to segment them out based on time – – short-term (less than one year), intermediate-term (1 year – 5 years), and long-term (5 years+). 
  2. Take inventory every quarter; the best tool to do this is called a balance sheet. If you need one, send an email to info@ready2buildwealth.com and write “Balance Sheet” in the subject line.
  3. Do a budget; I don’t care if you use pen/paper, an app, or some fancy software. Pick a budgeting strategy you can commit to doing.
  4. Strive to get all your credit scores above 720
  5. Have a FULL understanding and leverage ALL employer-sponsored benefits
  6. Get PLENTY of life insurance; If you’re single, you should get some. And, the coverage you have through your job isn’t enough, or it’s only enough while you still have employment with that company. Life insurance from your job is rarely portable.
  7. Invest for retirement outside of what your job offers. (If your budget allows)
  8. Have a non-retirement based investment account (If your budget allows)
  9. Buy real estate 
  10. Have good tax person
  11. Start saving/investing for your child’s college education right after their birth; (Everyone gets an 18-year head start, so what are you waiting for?)
  12. Have a good estate planning attorney
  13. Review and update your plan WHENEVER you have a life-altering event.
  14. Start an investment club with your family or friends
  15. Read this book called The #BUILDWEALTH Challenge: 8 Challenges to change the way you THINK and FEEL about money

Imagine if everyone followed these 15 steps. Of course, there are probably more things I could’ve listed, but this list is pretty solid. I even feel confident enough to guarantee that we could disrupt generational poverty for sure if everyone followed those 15 steps. But, I know people will make the conscious decision to do something different, even though I’ve given them the “cheat-code.” 

Where do we go from here? Well, I need your help in spreading the word. I will not be able to disrupt generational poverty all by my lonesome. It’s going to take an army. I have many ideas on how to address this issue of generational poverty, and if you’re open to having a conversation and helping me out on this quest, shoot me a note to info@ready2buildwealth.com, and in the subject line, write “Let’s Work.” 

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The Project 100 recap

I had this crazy idea that I acted on as 2019 concluded. I wanted to kick off 2020 with a challenge and not some fitness or dieting challenge. I wanted a challenge that would focus on spreading financial literacy to the masses. I decided that I would attempt to conduct 100 free financial planning workshops. I would focus specifically on non-profit organizations, and I figured some for-profit entities would come along (and perhaps even pay me). Either way, I had a number, and I was going to focus on hitting it.

I determined that non-profit organizations would be a great target because they generally don’t provide (or have the budget) to conduct comprehensive financial literacy training for their staff. Yes, I realize some non-profit organizations have a huge bankroll, but I know that many non-profits don’t. Not only did I want to assist the staff, but I also wanted to extend the effort to any people in the community that the organization served. I had one stipulation, for any session that I was going to conduct, I required (20) people to attend. I assumed that it wouldn’t be hard for twenty people to gather and talk about money. I mean, so many people complain and are upset about the wealth disparities in this country, so people should flock to a free financial planning session. Right?

I knew doing this challenge alone would be silly, so I reached out to my Urban Financial Services Coalition – SF Bay Area Chapter (UFSC) family and explained the challenge. They were onboard and specified that I do something unique just for them. We decided on doing a Project 100 session every 2nd and 4th Wednesday virtually. This way, I could open up this opportunity to anyone across the world who had an internet connection. And, since I had all these Wednesday’s, this would give people ample chances to attend at some point. I would do something different for these virtual sessions since I was in full control. I set a deadline for getting the twenty people. Since the event was happening Wednesday nights, I put a deadline for registrations. The deadline was always at 6:30p PT on the Monday prior. If I got the twenty, the session happened. If I didn’t, the session wouldn’t happen. Since this was a free effort, I wanted people to help promote it because I knew that I alone wouldn’t always be able to muster up the twenty. Plus, if ten people registered and brought one other person, that would get us to twenty. Easy right?

So, here are the final numbers from the Project 100:

Number of sessions conducted – 54

Number of people impacted (attendees) – 892

At first glance, yes, I failed miserably. The goal was to conduct 100 sessions, and I fell short by 46. So, if I were in school, a grade of 54% would be an F. Luckily for me, this isn’t school, and despite this grade, I looked at this project as a huge success. 

Success #1: This Project forced me to create a marketing plan and stick to it. Part of that plan was putting together a short video clip where I laid out “my ask.” I recorded a short video stating (1) the purpose of my effort and (2) encouraged people to register for one of those Wednesday sessions or schedule a time to discuss the details of speaking at their organization. I posted this video EVERY…SINGLE…DAY on Instagram, LinkedIn, and Facebook. I dialed things back in November, but I went “hard in the paint” for ten straight months!

Success #2: Some people couldn’t believe what I was attempting to accomplish and thought it was quite admirable. They repeatedly asked how else could they support me, so I sent them the link to purchase copies of my book The #BUILDWEALH Challenge – 8 Challenges to change the way you THINK and FEEL about money.

Success #3: I kept showing up on people’s social media feed so much throughout the year, that I landed new clients and customers due to my marketing efforts. (They opted to skip my workshop and just wanted to get down to work. I love people like that!)

Success #4: I made connections with leaders of organizations that I probably would have never had the pleasure of meeting. These leaders have taken it upon themselves to do this incredible work within their respective communities, and now I can say I have a personal connection with them. 

Success #5: I helped almost 900 people begin their journey to becoming a financial rockstar or enhance their current financial plans.

Despite the awesomeness this project produced, it also served as a valuable learning experience. The things I took away from this project will definitely shape future efforts for The #BuildWealth Movement™.

Learning #1: People don’t value free financial planning information.

Learning #2: More people commented on my videos about how much my hair grew over 2020. (As a result of the pandemic, I didn’t spend much time in the barbershop during the year) Many of those same people never attended a session.

Learning #3: Even when you’re a credible person who is adequately licensed and has over a decade-plus experience within the industry, people will still think you’re a snake oil salesperson if you’re giving something away for free. 

Learning #4: People will get to work on their financial plan when THEY are good and ready. Many people registered for multiple sessions throughout the year and never attended. I guess they think waiting is the answer to their financial struggles. (Insert slapping yourself in the face emoji)

Learning #5: I have a gift. That gift lies in my ability to break down the complexities of financial planning in a way that is easy to digest. I also sprinkle in a bit of humor, which always goes over well with any audience. And lastly, the activity that I conducted during those 1-hour sessions blew people’s minds! (Multiple people gave me that feedback after the sessions)

I thoroughly enjoyed this Project 100 experience. I haven’t the slightest clue what wild ideas my brain will draw up next, but I know that I will act on it when it happens. Plus, I feel really good inside because I was able to impact so many lives. I may not always get validation from people after a session, but I know that my message was and is being shared with hundreds of people that I’ll probably never have the chance to meet. That’s why I do what I do.

I’ll conclude with this. Suppose your organization (not-for-profit or for-profit) is looking for a dynamic speaker who can assist you with your financial education efforts. In that case, I’d love to connect and take you through the workshop that so many experienced in 2020. Just send your request to info@ready2buildwealth.com.

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Permanent Life Insurance 101

All permanent life insurance policies are not created equally. Yes, all permanent life insurance policies provide protection for your lifetime. Yes, they typically have some capacity to build cash value. These policies build cash value and their potential for the amount are critical differences among them.

Let’s take a look at each type of permanent policy:

Whole Life: this is the insurance policy that most people think of when they hear permanent insurance. It also happens to be the policy that will have the highest premiums. If you pay your premiums on time, your coverage will stay in force and your policy will build cash value. This type of policy works great for the individual who will buy a policy and stash it in their filing cabinet.

Variable Life: this policy provides death benefits and cash values that vary with the performance of a portfolio of underlying investment options. You can allocate premiums among various investment options offering different degrees of risk and reward: stocks, bonds, or a fixed account that guarantees interest and principal. A variable policy is right for someone willing to assume investment risk to achieve greater returns.

With such a policy, you are shifting the investment risk from the insurance company to yourself. Good investment performance would provide for the potential for higher cash values and death benefits. However, if the underlying investments perform poorly, cash values and death benefits will drop accordingly.

Universal Life (UL): this policy can be great if you would like to earn interest within the policy while getting more flexibility than a traditional whole life policy allows. You can choose your premium payment schedule and you might have the potential to earn more cash value. Most UL policies will earn a minimum interest rate, giving you a level of security about the earnings. You can also borrow or take withdrawals from the cash value that accumulates in your policy.

Indexed Universal Life (IUL): IUL’s can credit interest based on the performance of independent financial indices, unlike other universal products, which credit interest based on rates declared in advance by the insurance company. The most popular indices used for IUL’s are stock indices calculated without dividends. Please note, the money in an IUL policy is not directly invested in any of the indices.

IUL policy owners may decide how much of the policy cash value is allocated to the index feature and how much is allocated to a fixed-interest option. Cash value assigned to the index is usually credited with interest based on the change in the index value from one year to the next (Annual point-to-point). Each index option includes a maximum (cap) and minimum (floor) rate that protects consumers from loss but limits upside growth. These are generally subject to change by the insurance company, though they will never be reduced below a contractual minimum.

Variable Universal Life (VUL): a VUL can give you the flexibility of a universal policy but adds an investment element. You oversee how the parts of your premium payments not needed for your actual cost and charges (the net premium) are invested. You have a choice of investment options (called subaccounts). You decide how much of your net premiums should be allocated to each of the options you select. The subaccounts can invest in stocks, bonds, and other funds.

Since your policy’s cash value may be tied to the financial market, this policy provides the potential for returns higher than a universal policy. Still, it can also lose value if the investment results are poor. A VUL is suitable for people who like the investment element, can fund the policy properly, and have adequate time to build cash value.

Survivorship or Second-to-Die: this policy is designed to cover two people. It will pay a death benefit once both insured people have died and are often less expensive than two separate policies.

These types of policies are often used in estate conservation strategies, especially in conjunction with an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT), to pay estate taxes; this can be used to preserve a wealthy couple’s estate so it can be passed on to the next generation or a charitable organization. Survivorship policies are often recommended if one person would otherwise not be able to qualify for life insurance.

Whole, variable, universal, and variable universal life policies come in survivorship versions.

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Credit Should Have Been Explained This Way

Credit is really, really important. Don’t agree? Take a look at the United States National Debt figures. This country wasn’t built on paying for things with cash. Yes, our government hasn’t done the greatest job of managing debt over the years. The inability to effectively manage it has had a lasting impression on individuals when it comes to managing their credit.

For starters, most people have serious trouble defining credit. If someone were to ask you what credit is, would you be able to rattle off a simple definition? If not, don’t worry. Credit can be summed up with this acronym, O.P.M. (Other People’s Money). Simple right? Depending on what source you reference, you may see a definition similar to this; credit is the customer’s ability to obtain goods or services before payment, based on the trust that payment will be made in the future. But why is something so fundamental to our country’s existence such a misunderstood concept?

The Urban Financial Services Coalition (San Francisco Bay Area chapter) was hosting a workshop on understanding the importance of credit. During the Q&A portion, a young man wanted to comment on how he learned about credit. He stated that his story was simple and one that should be shared with everyone. The young man’s story starts with him being in college, and his mailbox was full of credit card offers. He knew that establishing credit was essential but didn’t know the first thing about it. Up to this point, he only heard something like how credit was bad and that you should avoid at all cost. Note: for those of you who believe that, please consider changing your opinion. The young man decided that he needed to seek counsel as it applied to get this credit card, and he reached out to someone he knew was good with money – – his mother. Note: when seeking financial advice, please consider a professional or, at minimum, someone who is good with money.

During this brief 10-minute conversation with his mother, the young man learned how to ensure that his credit would always remain stellar. His first question to his mother dealt with which card he should select and from which financial institution. He had offers from both banks and credit unions. His mother said pick the card that you think looks the coolest. Why on earth would she say that? The mother knew that any financial institution sending such mail wouldn’t offer a college student any great credit card deals. It would be their basic student card, which probably wouldn’t have an annual fee. And for applying, they would probably get a t-shirt or some other tchotchke.

The young man didn’t think picking a card was that easy and expressed to his mother that he “heard” that he should be concerned about the interest rate before applying for a credit card. The mother gave him a great lesson about interest that all should take heed. The interest rate will never apply to you if you pay off your bill in full each month. In case you missed it, it’s worth repeating. THE INTEREST RATE ON A CREDIT CARD WILL NEVER APPLY TO YOU IF YOU PAY OFF YOUR BALANCE IN FULL EACH MONTH.

Reader Challenge: Go out and survey 10 people. Ask the question: What is the biggest thing for you to consider when shopping for a new credit card? The chances are that 8 or 9 out of the 10 people you ask will say the interest rate is THE most important thing. The sad thing is, if the interest rate is their top concern, then they have already lost. They tell you that they don’t manage money well and are okay with overspending/living above their means and, as a result paying their financial institution more money than they deserve.

Next, the young man asked his mother how he should use his brand new credit card. She said to make a few small purchases each month and pay off the balance in full when receiving your statement. She informed him that his credit limit would probably be pretty low (it was $200) since he was new to credit, plus the fact that he was a college student. And unless it was a real emergency, he should NEVER get close to that $200 limit. She reminded him that spending on a credit card is like getting a 30-day, interest-free loan. If you don’t pay off your balance in full, that dreadful interest will most certainly kick it. She went on further to explain that as a result of him sticking to this simple process, the financial institution would probably raise his limit. She warned him that just because they raise his limit doesn’t mean he should spend more. He should stick to his simple plan of making a few small purchases each month and pay off the balance in full, no matter how high is limit may become.

As a result of that conversation with his mother, the young man never had credit issues. Of course, his mother didn’t share with him all the moving parts when it comes to credit; like there being 3 credit bureaus, the credit score and how all 3 bureaus report it different, how your credit score is calculated, why checking your credit report from all 3 bureaus each year is critical, etc. The biggest thing the mother did for this young man was keeping it super simple. Many of us tend to complicate financial matters, causing a ton of stress in our lives. This young man has always viewed credit positively, primarily because his credit was indeed stellar. He learned how it worked and adopted a great habit early on. It also helped that the person he received the advice from was a great steward of credit.

Not all of us will be fortunate enough to have parents who understand credit and how the game works. 

Imagine what if everyone had someone break down credit before getting their first credit card as this mother did for her son. Debt (credit card debt specifically) probably wouldn’t be much of an issue.

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Conflicting Priorities

Setting up and sticking to a financial game plan is hard for most individuals. Adding a child to the mix makes it even more challenging. Parents have tough decisions to make every single day of their lives. One of the most significant financial decisions they must make is deciding how they want (if they have the desire) to fund their children’s college education. In addition to college planning, most parents also need to make sure they are properly planning for retirement. So, which one is more important?

College is not getting any cheaper. With the continual increases in tuition and fees, parents need to seriously consider the various options they can access for college planning. The most popular vehicle today is the 529 college savings plan. Aside from the 529 plan, parents can also utilize a Coverdell Education Savings account, UTMA/UGMA, Life Insurance, IRA’s, or U.S. savings bonds. Each of these solutions has pros and cons, so be sure to consult with your financial advisor about which option makes the most sense for your situation. Suppose none of these options has ever crossed your mind. In that case, there are other methods of funding a college education which most of you are familiar with – – loans, grants, and scholarships. With grants and scholarships, the money is given to you, but loans you must payback. If you can outright avoid loans, please do, but they are a great source of funding and sometimes they end up being the only option.

Retirement is on every working adult’s mind and when that day comes, hopefully, you are financially prepared. If your employer offers a retirement account (like a 401K), you should be utilizing it. Suppose your employer doesn’t provide such a benefit or you’re the business owner. In that case, it’s up to you to take care of your retirement program. Depending on where you work, your company may still offer a pension plan, which means the company is putting money into an account on your behalf to utilize during retirement. Pension plans are slowly becoming a thing of the past because they are costly to keep in force; thus, companies are putting more responsibility on the individual to take care of their retirement needs. In addition to those retirement options, the government will provide some assistance via social security. By itself, social security will not be able to support you during your retirement years altogether; thus, you need to make sure to take full advantage of your retirement benefits through your employer if offered. If those retirement benefits are not in place, then you should pick up the phone or send an email to your financial advisor and get to work.

Have you figured out which one is more important? Your answer should have been retirement, and here’s why. With retirement, if you don’t set up a plan and stick to it, there are no loans, grants, or scholarships to bail you out. At that point, you only have two choices: (1) retire with less money or (2) work longer. Most people probably don’t like either one of those choices. Still, unfortunately, that is going to be a reality for many people. College planning is a huge priority for many parents, but there will always be loans, grants, and scholarships. Such options don’t exist when it comes to retirement, so if you are a parent and try to figure out which one to focus on, choose retirement.

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Buy Term and Invest the difference

Many people struggle over which type of life insurance makes the most sense for their situation, term insurance or permanent insurance. The difference between the two comes down to cost. Some experts will question why you should pay for an expensive permanent policy when you could buy term (which is way more affordable). With the savings, you could invest in a mutual fund, annuity, stocks, bonds, or other investment vehicles. The idea is that investing that “difference” (premium savings) would replace or exceed the cash value accumulation of permanent insurance.

If you decide if this strategy is right for you, you need to consider what best suits YOUR objectives and circumstances seriously. Think about this:

  • You may not have the discipline to invest the difference.
  • Suppose you need to renew or reapply for your term policy. In that case, the cost may become prohibitive as you get older or develop health problems.
  • If health problems occur, you could become uninsurable and not even purchase term insurance when renewing your policy.
  • The difference between your term insurance premium and the amount of the premium for your permanent insurance is substantial. It would be best if you had the discipline to invest the difference and invest early. You will need to make up for the dramatic increase in term insurance costs at later ages.
  • The investment you choose may not perform as you hoped.

Please make sure to weigh your knowledge about your habits carefully. Also, be sure to review the benefits, risks, product features, and any current or future charges associated with any insurance and investment product before deciding how to address your particular needs. When in doubt, schedule time with a professional because they can help you sort through all your options and ultimately make the decision that will be in your best interest.

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All IRA’s Are Not Created Equally

The individual retirement account (known as the IRA) was created to allow people to stash away money for retirement on a tax-favorable basis. There is a variety of IRA’s; some are specifically for individuals and others serve business owners. From banks to mutual fund companies to brokerage firms, numerous financial institutions will allow you to open such an account. Most people might not be aware of this but there is a huge difference between a bank IRA and a brokerage IRA.

Bank IRA’s are a great place to put your retirement dollars if you are looking for safety and security. Such accounts will utilize certificates of deposits (CD’s) or other safe options like money market funds to invest your dollars. You can be assured that by having your money here, you will not lose a cent. Plus, having your funds placed there allows them to be protected by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Some banks may offer riskier options, like mutual funds (which are not covered by the FDIC), but the safe options are primarily what you will typically see. This doesn’t seem like a big deal on the surface; however, playing it too safe with your retirement dollars could hurt you in the long run. By their very nature, banking solutions are low-yielding; thus, this will subject you to purchasing power (your dollar today won’t be worth much in the future) risk over time due to inflation. IRA’s were designed to be utilized as a long-term financial instrument, which means it isn’t wise to use CDs or money markets (which are more geared towards short-term goals) to fund your retirement. A bank IRA makes perfect sense if you are within a couple of years of retirement because you can’t afford to be too risky only since you don’t have enough time to make up any losses. Or, if you don’t have the appetite to take any substantial risk with your money, this option is also appropriate.

The brokerage IRA enables you to purchase securities… stocks, bonds, mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETF’s), etc. However, by purchasing securities, you are adding more risk to the equation. Unlike the bank IRA, you could lose some of your initial investment and you will see your account balance fluctuate over time. This usually scares people but have you ever thought about your retirement account in this manner. What if retirement is 10/20/30 years away, and the market is down and as a result, so is your account balance. If you’re not at retirement age, meaning you do not need these funds, then you have only “lost” on paper. Why exactly are you worried? Most people don’t have an excellent response to that; thus, we need to change the way we think about short-term news concerning our long-term accounts.

No one individual has control over the stock market, but over the long-haul, having money in the stock market can be extremely rewarding for your brokerage IRA. The neat thing about the brokerage IRA is that you can invest in a money market type of fund, along with the other riskier solutions. The one thing you want to avoid is having a brokerage IRA open and ONLY having money market funds within it. This happens quite often because people will rollover funds from an old 401k or 403b and the money will sit in a money market fund (which is the default), not being invested. Or, they will open a brokerage IRA, fund it, and never make a decision on what to invest in. Take full advantage of all your options within the brokerage IRA.

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50/20/30 Plan

The budget is the quintessential piece of any financial game plan; however, it tends to be a considerable challenge for most people. Some people have even done away with using the b-word because of its negative connotation. Why is it so negative? Well, anytime you hear the word budget in the news, it’s because the government can’t balance it, and some item needs to be eliminated.

You rarely hear the word “budget,” and something positive comes out of it. This is the exact reason why the average person has such a hard time doing a budget. They are continually witnessing a group of people (the government) struggle to spend money appropriately. Then they look at themselves in the mirror and figure they pretty much don’t stand a chance against the abominable budget.

What’s the solution? For starters, people need to begin to use a spending plan instead of a budget. A spending plan sounds so much friendlier. Plus, we all love to spend money, so why not focus more on our spending habits instead of cutting things out of our lives. A simple paradigm shift is the answer.

All spending plans are not created equally and you must find one that fits your personality. The 50/20/30 plan is a simple spending plan that most people might like regularly doing. Here’s how it works: Once you get your paycheck, no more than 50% of it should be spent on essentials; your rent or mortgage/food/transportation/utilities. 20% should apply to financial obligations; savings, retirement, insurances, investments, paying off debt. 30% applies to your lifestyle; whatever else you want to spend your money on, it’s up to you!

The 50/20/30 plan is a basic framework and its simplicity is the reason you might stick to it. Plus, the fact that you’re free to spend 30% of your money on whatever you want should make you a bit happier about doing a spending plan each month.

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5 Timeless Financial Tips

Most people would agree that discussing your finances can be extremely challenging. The biggest hurdle that plagues us – – getting started. Like anything else, when it comes to beginning your journey to financial glory, you must set a goal. Once the goal is set, now it’s time to take action.

Of course, there are no “one-size fits all” type of approach, and no matter where you are in your life, you may need to address one or all of the following as it applies to your financial game plan:

(1) Create a spending plan (also known as the budget).

How much do you earn? How much do you spend? How much are your bills each month? How much do you save/invest? Try your best to stick to a spending plan each month and have someone hold you accountable when you do not stick to it. Please do not beat yourself up if you don’t stick to it each month because it’s hard to change your spending habits overnight. Grade yourself on a 3-month basis because if you can manage this over an extended period, then guess what, you’ve created a brand new habit! And if the conventional way of “budgeting” doesn’t work for you, consider an alternate strategy, like the 50/20/30 plan.

(2) Pay off credit card debt.

We all know that credit card companies make money off the interest they charge on your account. Here are a couple of tips: 1) Stop spending money that you don’t have; 2) Pay off the card with the highest interest rate; 3) Consider paying off the smaller balance (this will give you the emotional jolt to continue to fight against the larger balance) 4) If possible, pay more than the minimum payment each month. 5) Try the debt-snowball technique

(3) Build an emergency fund.

Make sure to have between 3-6 months worth of living expenses saved at all times. Or for those over-achievers, considering having 9 months to 1 year’s worth. This may be a challenge, but you will never be upset with yourself for saving money when an actual emergency pops up.

(4) Determine personal insurance needs.

Many people may be uninsured or under-insured, which could prove detrimental to your overall financial game plan if the unexpected happens. Consider your situation and see if life insurance and disability income insurance provided by your employer will sufficiently cover your needs. If need be, consider owning personal insurance outside of what is offered through your job. Please note, if you change jobs or lose your job, you will typically lose those employer-provided benefits because the employer is paying the premiums; thus, you don’t “own” the policy. Personal policies can help ensure that you’re protected, no matter where you work or what happens with your job situation. Also, your age and health play a HUGE role in how an insurance company will set the price of their policy, so please keep that in mind.

(5) Begin/review your retirement plan.

We all work extremely hard, but what do we have to show for all our years of service? Many companies are doing away with pension plans; thus, the responsibility of putting money away for retirement falls on our shoulders. Take advantage of your employer-sponsored retirement plans like a 401(k) or 403(b) because these plans allow you to invest monies tax-deferred. An excellent benefit of these plans is that they take money out of your check before getting paid. There are also ways to save for retirement outside of an employer-sponsored plan. Consider opening an IRA (traditional or Roth) or a brokerage account. An annuity or life insurance contract could also be an option. If you decide to save for retirement outside of your employer-sponsored plan, consult with a financial professional. You’ll need to be aware of contribution limits, tax treatment, and how the accounts work.

5 reasons

5 Reasons to Buy Life Insurance

Did you know that life insurance is not for those who die? It’s for those who live. Suppose you die and have life insurance in place. In that case, the people you love and care about (your beneficiaries) will receive a sum of money. They can use this money for anything; however, its primary purpose is to help make up for the loss of your income. The money that they receive is generally free of federal income tax and is usually used to address the following:

  1. Daily Living Expenses: help maintain your family’s lifestyle by replacing your current income. The proceeds can help make sure there is food in the refrigerator, utility bills covered, the car loan payment is on time, etc.
  2. Home: help protect your family’s home by enabling them to pay off the mortgage. It’s crucial because it can help them stay where they are comfortable and in a place that’s filled with memories.
  3. Education: help safeguard your child’s future by keeping the college fund intact. This will ensure that there will be money for their education no matter what
  4. Final expenses: help provide funds to pay estate taxes and other expenses, such as funeral costs, outstanding medical bills, etc. This will prevent leaving a financial burden while your family grieves.
  5. Retirement: help ensure a solid retirement for your spouse or partner since you’re no longer there.

While individual needs can be covered by life insurance, it also comes in handy for a business owner. Having life insurance can aid with business continuation. Life insurance can help keep the business in the family according to your intentions. There are many layers to the fantastic product called life insurance, and now, you know the “why” behind it.